Book Review: The Persolus Race, Volume one – Edited by Alex O’Neill, Rachel Shipp and M M Dixon

This book is a meaty collection of Sci-fi stories that were put together during the Covid crisis and written by writers that have never met in person but have only had contact on social media. It is presented in chronological order, taking us from 2450 all the way to 4417. From their brief biographies it appears that the writers are a diverse bunch who are spread across the globe. I enjoyed the varied writing styles that reflect the different authors. I might have a couple of favourites but all of the stories offer the readers something of interest, adding to the art of sci-fi.

The book documents the search for other life across the years with the idea of ‘Eden’ or multiple Edens and the building of community as a recurring theme. As ever was, there is vital information hidden by government that puts citizens at risk on more than one occasion. It is based on the ‘Rare Earth’ premise that we are alone in the universe We are shown unique tales of future human life that weave together well. At times, there is a bleak portrait of life that suggests we haven’t learnt from history – there are wars, duplicity, power struggles and even community payback. Personally, I love tales of cyborgs and I was not disappointed – there are also some very helpful and quirky robots. Unfortunately, we still have not learnt to accept people for what they are and celebrate difference.

For me, the book hangs together well and has been edited to a high standard. Volume One suggests there is more to come and I look forward to reading where the writers take us next. Let’s hope that we might learn some of the lessons that history teaches us but I do doubt it. I can’t wait for the next offerings.

Find out more about The Persolus Race on the project’s official website.

Review by Carolyn Batcheler

Keep up to date with all new content on Joyzine via our
Facebook / Twitter / Instagram / Mailing List

2 comments

Leave a Comment

%d bloggers like this: